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Archive for January 2012

Bring vs Take

By Judy Vorfeld While there are many mean­ings for both “bring” and “take, many peo­ple are divided over usage like “Please take it with you” vs. “Please bring it with you.” The Gregg Reference Manual, Ninth Edition, says: “Bring” indi­cates motion toward the speaker. “Take” indi­cates motion away […]

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Homonym Heaven

The Internet: Homonym Heaven! By Judy Vorfeld Have you ever vis­ited a visu­ally attrac­tive site and then spot­ted phrases such as, “If your inter­ested in learn­ing more about our Websight, e-mail us,” or “This prod­uct comes with an uncon­di­tional guar­an­tee. It’s high qual­ity will make you’re life better!”? […]

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Your Fault or You’re Fault?

By Judy Vorfeld Your and you’re are two of the most com­monly mis­un­der­stood words in the Wide Wide World. “Your” is the pos­ses­sive form of the word “you.” It’s used as a mod­i­fier before a noun, e.g., “Thanks for your let­ter.” “Your” means some­one owns or has some­thing: your car, […]

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Words That Often Obfuscate

By Judy Vorfeld What do I mean by words that obfus­cate? In fact, what does “obfus­cate” mean? It’s a word that rarely finds a home in a nor­mal busi­ness let­ter. Let’s ana­lyze just a few words that don’t belong in most busi­ness doc­u­ments or on many web­sites (it all depends on the […]

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King: Content or Copy?

By Judy Vorfeld Ever get con­fused about the dif­fer­ences between online con­tent and online copy? Join the crowd. Merriam-Webster’s* defines con­tent as “the prin­ci­pal sub­stance (as writ­ten mat­ter, illus­tra­tions, or music) offered by a World Wide Web site.” The Web Content Style Guide (McGovern, et al.), says that […]

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